Hum Hum Humming along…

For anyone who knows me, or who doesn’t know me but have traipsed thru a few of my blog postings, you know I am a bird lover. In my mind, how can one not feel completely amazed by (and in love with) birds? Sure, sure – just like anything in life, we have different hobbies, passions, and things that lure us to love and enjoy. For me, birds are something I clearly enjoy 🙂

That said, the Ruby-throated Hummingbird is really a ridiculously amazing bird. All hummingbirds are, but in this instance, it’s the only species of Hummingbird I’ve seen in person, and the only one native to where I live (with a rare appearance of other species like the Rufuos or Black-chinned).

By this time of year, it becomes a rare occasion to see the Ruby throats, as they all migrate south for the winter. But for the straggler, it helps them to keep a feeder of nectar (basically sugar water) so they can fuel up along the way.

And so, from last Saturday thru Tuesday, I had a migratory juvenile (yes, meaning hatched this spring/summer!) male, who visited my feeder about every hour or so during each day, to plump up for his 2000 mile trek to (most likely) southern Mexico. Hummers don’t stay here but for spring to fall, and in fact breed and have their babies where they call home for the summer – from Canada south to Florida, and as far west as the Rockies. When they migrate, hummingbirds aren’t flock type birds, they do this all solo, by instinct as it were for this little guy. And yes, they’ll fly non-stop across the Gulf of Mexico, another phenomenal fact!

And, as they remember their route, there’s a good chance he will be back in the spring to my feeder – and will be sporting his “adult” look of a full ruby colored “bib” around his neck. 🙂

You can read more super fascinating facts about these hummingbirds, here!

 

4 Comments Add yours

  1. Ahh! This is so beautiful! That you fed him for his long journey and that he might be back. Obviously you as a bird lover know it’s a him. 😉 Here’s to his good luck!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Manja! Yes, with many birds there are obvious and not so obvious ways to tell the sex. In this case, the streaked neck and white tipped tail feathers. By next summer, he’ll sport a full swath deep ruby red colored bib!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Interesting! So… are you sure you will be able to recognise him again? 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Well, probably not. I’d have to really try to compare specific features – plus he’ll be all grown with his ruby red throat. I may have to just pretend it’s him if I see a male grown hummingbird next spring at the feeder 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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